What is Ed Camp? AWESOME!

Have you heard of the newest movement in Professional Development? It’s called Ed Camp and it all started here in Philly.

What is Ed Camp? The following two video shorts explain it very well. Scroll below the videos to see pictures and my reflections about my first Ed Camp experience as well as additional Ed Camp resources.

If you have the chance to participate in an Ed Camp, do!

You will not be disappointed.



My Ed Camp Philly 2012 Experience!

This was my first Ed Camp. It was so much fun listening to and talking with other educators. No matter what the field or grade band, we all shared one thing: a passion for learning. Here’s how the day went:

1. Arrival. Ed Camp is not open to walk-ins. All attendees had pre-registered. This year’s camp was held in the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

2. Once checked in we immediately walked into the planning room where educators suggested topics of discussion and planned their day. There was plenty of chatter and excitement about the day and it’s possibilities.

Edcamp Philly 2012-8029

In addition to the break out sessions, there was the opportunity to spend time in deep discussion on a particular topic. This is called the Inquiry Room. The topic of discussion for the Inquiry Room was determined by suggestion and then vote. Teachers wrote their ideas on flip chart and voted by placing dots next to the topic they would like to explore in depth. The Inquiry Room topic of choice: Blended Learning. All of this activity, sharing and snacks took about an hour.
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3.  The next activity was a quick opening assembly where the expections of the day were explained.
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 Ed Camp “housekeeping”:

  1. What to expect
  2. “Rule of two feet”
  3. The Inquiry Room
  4. “Leave no trace”
  5. Security sign-in (required)
  6. Visit edcampphilly.org
  7. Lunch & after-party details

4. The schedule revealed (let the Twitter chat begin! #edcampphilly):
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5. Two morning session time blocks. I’ll post some pictures of what it looked like.
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Students participated in a presentation about physics, gaming and social networking.
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There was time for networking and professional sharing.
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6. Lunch: An hour of meeting, eating and sharing

7. The afternoon sessions-two more sessions of learning and sharing. What’s great about Ed Camp is that everyone participates and shares in every session.
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8. The Smackdown. The end of the day was a celebration and sharing. A smackdown is where people wanting to share have two minutes to do so. It’s fast and furious and fun! I’ll post some pictures from the experience.

The line-up:
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The sharing (more sharing of important Ed Camp resources below pictures):
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The incredible Ed Camp Philly organizers:
Edcamp Foundation Planning Meeting

Ed Camp resources:
Ed Camp Philly Ed Camp started in Philly. It is a result of gifted educators–and they met online!

Ed Camp Foundation Ed Camp has gone global in just two short years. I know why-it’s an amazing Professional Development experience.

Ed Camp Wiki Thinking you might like to host an Ed Camp? See this wiki for the how-to’s!

Ed Camp @ TEDxPhiladelphiaED-Kristen Swanson

Thanks, Kevin Jarrett, for sharing your photos!

 

PA Career, Education and Work Standards & ASCA Career Standards are aligned!

*Image source: http://www.globalfoodschool.org/

I received 2 emails from friend and mentor, Mike Thompson, this week. Mike is a fellow member of the PA Career Development Leaders Network. He has asked that I share this information. This information is important to all educators but if you are currently working to comply with PA Chapter 339 school counselling plan, you will find this information particularly useful.

#1

Dear Colleagues, 

At a recent board meeting of the Capital Region Partnership for Career Development a motion was approved to allow non-profit school districts in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania the right to print the “I” Statements without a cost under the condition that recognition be given on all printed documents to the Partnership. A finalized draft of this statement will be forthcoming. In the meantime, permission to print the attached documents is allowed (links to I Statemnents and ASCA Crosswalk  below). The attached documents are without the watermark that says, “Do Not Copy”. Please keep the statement at the bottom and the attached logo. 

The intent of these “I” Statements is to give school districts a manageable way to integrate the Career Education and Work Standards into all grade bands (K-12) and across disciplines. Another possible benefit of using these outcome statements is to develop a K-12 gap analysis where educators can strategically develop career development interventions to address all 4 grade bands and 4 strands over time. Additionally, these can serve as a great resource for parent and even IEP transition conferences when used in the form of a Career Portfolio. 

A revised statement at the top of all four of the documents describes the intent of the “I” statement outcomes. 

Currently, I am contracted to assist counselors within school districts across Pennsylvania to comply with the Chapter 339 requirement of developing a K-12 Guidance plan. The Pa. School Counselors Association has developed a Companion Guide to the ASCA National Model and a corresponding toolkit/implementation guide. The three domains that counselors are to impact for all students are:

v      Academic Development

v      Personal/Social Development

v      Career Development 

The CEW Standards and the ASCA Career Standards are aligned to enhance the career development/maturity of all students K-12. (Attached is a first draft crosswalk of the ASCA Career Standards and the Pa. Career Standards, compliments of Donna Cartia and Judy Bookhamer). 

The “I” Statements can be used by school districts to assist counselors developing a K-12 plan for cross discipline integration. I am very excited about the opportunity that school districts and all of their stakeholders have in developing a plan for career development for all students. Forward this email to as many people that you feel may benefit from its contents.  

Please contact me if you have questions. 

Mike 

PA CEW and ASCA Crosswalk & “I” Statements

PA Career, Educaiton and Work Standards

#2

Dear Colleagues,

Attached is a PDF of the 16 career clusters and the 5 career pathways model that is used by Middletown Area School District(and many others across the nation). The statement below is the rationale for using a cluster/pathway approach in education. Notice that this addresses academic and career maturity simultaneously. All stakeholder groups are addressed in this approach. Thinking with the “end in mind” for all students is critical. College and Career Readiness for all students and potential workers is our goal! Comprehensive Career Development leads to greater workforce development and ultimately the economic development of local communities and the nation(The“3 D’s”). 

Career Clusters/Pathways Deliver Multiple Benefits 

High Schools can be organized around career clusters/pathways to prepare students to meet the demands of postsecondary education and the expectations of employers. 

Educators can use a curriculum framework that can be adapted to meet local needs.  Assessments will be developed for each cluster, which educators can use to gauge how well they are meeting the academic and career needs of all students, regardless of their interests or employment goals. 

School Counselors can use career clusters/pathways to help students explore options for the future. Current information on the academic,technical, and college requirements students need for a wide range of careers can be found in the current Career Clusters/Pathways Knowledge and Skills and Career Clusters/Pathways Plans of Study. 

Employers and Industry Groups can partner with schools to contribute to the development of high academic standards that help students prepare for work and help workers keep their skill up-to-date. Employers gain workers prepared to learn new skills, adjust to technological change, and advance in their careers. 

Parentscan learn what academic and technical courses their children need for college and a variety of career fields.  Clusters/Pathways and the high standards that go with them reassure parents that their children will be fully prepared for college and the workplace. 

Students can use career clusters/pathways to investigate a wide range of career choices. The career cluster/pathway approach makes it easier for students to understand the relevance of their required courses and helps them select their elective courses more wisely. 

www.careerclusters.org —–Check it out! 

Mike

Popular Career Cluster Format in PA high schools

States Career Clusters

Michael D. Thompson

www.centralpenn.edu

What to teach when they have “visions of sugar plums” in their heads?


Yesterday afternoon I attended a high school department chair meeting. As we were discussing various items on the agenda, I started thinking about how kids behave in class that last day of school before the holidays (the principal was going over the building schedule for those last few days of school before break).

If you are looking for something creative, interesting and festive try this (and hit a few PA CEW academic standards at the same time):

1. Ask the kids to recite the twelve days of Christmas and then show them what the experts predict the “twelve days shopping list” would cost.
2. Begin a discussion as to why these things cost so much. Student thinking will prove interesting. Turn the topic to who could have been involved in producing these “gifts.” Why do we always discuss the cost of this list and not who has trained and earns a living providing these items and services?
3. Ask students to work together to brainstorm as many professions as they can that are involved making the 12 gifts.
4. If you have a Pathways or Career Clusters model in your school you might ask your students to put the identified professions into the proper paths. Bring technology into the picture with spreadsheets, presentations, etc.
5. Have your students share their thinking and presentations. Wish them a happy and restful break and enjoy!

PDE CEW Standard: 13.1 Career Awareness A-H

Thanksgiving was last week-is it too late to offer thanks?

Yesterday I was lucky to spend the day with my Career Development (CDLN) friends from across the state of PA. I love meeting with this group because they are smart, creative and share everything (best practices, theory, strategy, etc). We enjoy healthy debate and students across the commonwealth benefit from this exchange.

I found myself sharing my new e-portfolio model with my CDLN colleagues. (PA requires all school districts have students begin a portfolio by 8th grade-PA Career Education and Work (CEW) Academic Standard 13.2.8D) My model was developed as an example for students. I used my own career to populate the pages of the portfolio. As I was explaining my e-portfolio, I realized that most of the professional examples used as evidence of who I am as a professional educator, was a result of being a member of this group.

My last post offered a video about sharing. To really harness the power of sharing, you must be willing to listen and contribute to your team, give and take. Sharing makes everyone (students and teachers) better, stronger, and learners. Have I ever thanked the CDLN for sharing so openly with me? Not until now—Thank you!

What Does It Take to Create a Movement?

I’ve recently read the book Tribes by Seth Godin. Mr. Godin says, “a movement happens when people talk to one another, when ideas spread within the community, and most of all, when peer support leads people to do what they always knew was the right thing.”

Why is Career Development the right thing?

“For this generation, career maturity is as important as academic maturity. Both predict post-high school success.” Ken Gray, Penn State University

What is career maturity? What is success? How do we introduce Career Development academic interventions into our curriculum? What works? What doesn’t? Why should we care?

I cannot find a blog or tweet addressing career development before the college experience. My hope is, that together, we can start a discussion about academics and career development focusing on students K-12. Can we start a movement? Maybe we will become a tribe…

Sharing: The Moral Imperative
[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/hOsmgoGtIQI%5D