Integrating Career Development into Core Classrooms

college_student

Pennsylvania adopted Career Education and Work academic standards  (CEW) several years ago. A great idea but getting school districts and classroom teachers to integrate Career Development  activities in the general curriculum remains a challenge. There is always so much to do, common core, new teacher evaluations to worry about, curriculum to cover…you get the idea.

Over the school year, I worked with colleagues with the goal of developing CEW scaffolding for teachers. The scaffolds work across the curriculum. I will share our work below.

Please use the activities if you want to integrate Career Development activities in your classroom. (It’s easier than you think!) And if you try them, let me know what you think.

CEW-Putting CEW into Practice

CEW-The Problem Solving Process

CEW-Teamwork Rubric

CEW-Oral Presentation Rubric

CEW- Assignment-Project-Skills Inventory

CEW-Career Pathways- Aligned Skills Set

Additional resources: PA Career Standards, Pennsylvania Department of Education Standards Aligned System.

High School Internships-Just Do It!


This video highlights Hatboro-Horsham High School’s internship program.

The diversity of our students’ interests and internship experiences is amazing! Hatboro-Horsham students have worked on engineering projects (installing and monitoring a solar collecting parking lot; the reconstruction of Rt. 309), in healthcare (hospitals, physical therapy, fitness, nutritional science, pharmaceutical science, dementia research), art and design (fashion design, architecture, photography). They have interned with the township parks system, at a long term projection weather agency, local television stations-we could go on and on. Our students are always teaching us about the world of work and of the possibilities for their futures.

The high school internship keeps seniors engaged in school during the senior year and benefits the student and their families beyond the internship experience:

  1. High school interns do better in their post-secondary studies.
  2. High school interns graduate from post-secondary colleges and trade schools at a higher rate than their non-interning peers.
  3. High school interns graduate college in a more timely manner (with less post-secondary debt) than students who do not take advantage of this opportunity.

For more information about our internship program. (Includes a student produced documentary.)

Sampler: Student placements.

And if you are a student reading this, the following YouTube is a must see:
The Other 4.0 That Really Matters In College & Life

Senior internship puts you on the path to the 4.0 that really matters: (1) Personal capital, (2) Intellectual capital, (3) Social capital and (4) Financial capital

Important recognition: This program has evolved. Starting with 14 students in our first year and growing to well over 100 students a year, we, a team of teachers have worked, developed and tweaked the internship experience again and again. Without my colleagues interest and shared passion for authentic learning this student experience would not be as great as it is!

Thank you Terrie, Donna, Ted, Carol, Terri, Lauren, Jen and Lance!

We also depend heavily on our community mentors for leadership, career guidance (for students) and support. Thanks to all!

Thanks to Bob Anderson for the beautiful documentary at the top of this post.

-Careerteacher

Keep the Conversation Going

Last week I recieved a direct Twitter message from a member of my PLN. In it was this simple message, “Keep the conversation going.” Patricia Hudak, thank you for the push.

Patricia is correct, the positive impact that career development academic interventions have on students is great and the conversation must not slip away. With so much attention devoted to teacher accountability, high stakes testing, etc. our focus seems to be getting lost. We must focus on students and learning.

My role has changed this school year. The career development/personal discovery course that was once required of all students in my school district is no more. It is my assignment to recreate the experience as an elective. To see where we have been and are now in Pathways class visit my teacher website.

I’ve discovered three TEDx videos that have been particularly meaningful in my work this fall.

Do you know your students “sparks”? Do you encourage them to pursue them? Do you connect your classroom content to them? I sent this talk to a retired administrator and former mentor. She responded with this: “I need to change my conversations with my grandchildren. I need to honor their sparks.” Practicing educators must change their conversations too.

Peter Benson: Sparks-How Youth Thrive

In the “new” Pathways class, I am piloting Road Trip Nation. It’s an exciting, interactive curriculum that will eventually lead us to a road trip that my students will plan based on their sparks and passions. It requires that my students discover and  investigate their interests. The following TED talk is directed at high school students and fits in nicely with the RTN curriculum. I’m going to show this to my class on Wednesday and look forward to the discussion that follows.

 Jullien Gordon: Driving School for Life

And finally, one for the older/college aged student in your life.

Larry Smith: Why you will fail to have a great career

School Counts!

NEW PROJECT–A collaboration between local Chambers of Commerce and the School District!

I recently presented this project to the general membership of our local Chambers. The two Chambers executive boards, school administrators and I modeled this project from a similar program that was presented at the Integrated Learning Conference in 2011 at Penn State University.

Preparing students for success after graduation is a high priority for  Hatboro-Horsham School District. Whether  they attend a two- or four-year college, a technical, apprenticeship, military program or immediately enter the workforce, HH is committed to ensuring all students have the necessary skills and career maturity required to succeed. 

The Greater Horsham Chamber of Commerce and The Greater Hatboro Chamber of Commerce together with the high school have collaborated to develop an employability certificate called the “School Counts Employability Certificate.”

The certificate connects learning in school to success in our community.

*Thanks to my friend Betty Holmboe for the inspiration and to Mary Dare, Jo-Anne Zapata and Becky Felton of the Horsham Chamber for helping me get this off the ground.

 

A Career Portfolio or a Portfolio Career?

e-portfolio

We teachers need a wake-up call. Do we really understand the world our students are entering? To answer that question, think about this question first: When was the last time you applied for a job?

If it hasn’t been in a few years, then you likely have no idea what it’s like “out there.” (Do you know what a two column cover letter is?) And if you don’t know what the latest trends in job acquisition are, how can you equip your students? I know what you are thinking, “What do I care? My students are going to college.”

College and career readiness is getting a lot of press. Our future college students will soon be looking for meaningful internships. Do they know how to find one? Students going to community college will likely be working and going to school. They needed a job yesterday. Students going directly into the workforce want to find work that is more fulfilling than flipping burgers.

NPR’s Morning Edition, May 11, 2012: only 50% of young adults in their 20s who are college grads are employed full-time and only 1 in 5 working twenty somethings say they are in a career track job. I  frequently tell my students that they are all career prep. Everyone one of them will have a career; it’s just a matter of when they begin their work life.

All students need strong job acquisition skills.

The new reality: a portfolio career. It’s different from a career portfolio. A portfolio career is about achieving balance in life and having meaningful and fulfilling work. People with a portfolio career have no jobs, they have projects. They enjoy autonomy and use the skills they enjoy using as they support themselves and their families. They are their own CEO; they are their own means of production.

In today’s difficult job market our students will need the skills necessary to create a portfolio career for themselves. Some workforce experts believe a portfolio career will become the norm.

Intrigued? Me too. It’s time to help our students prepare.

Katie Ledger TEDx: Your New Job (explains the portfolio career)  

PA Academic Standards: Career, Education and Work > Career Acquisition 13.2 b, c, d, e

Cultivating Awe: Tending to the mind fires of 21st century educators

I “met” Dave Rothacker last year as a result of our mutual concern about student success after high school-in other words, we’re both interested in career development. Dave recently wrote  about my work on his blog Cultivating Awe. Dave, I am humbled. And thank you for calling attention to this important work.

Zsuefox21stcenturywordcloud

Suburban Schools Study Council Meeting

The Suburban Schools Study Council membership includes current and retired school superintendents from Bucks and Montgomery (Pennsylvania) counties. My school district superintendent asked me to speak about community based learning at a recent council meeting. I was humbled and proud to have this invitation. My presentation and slide notes:

Slide 1:

  • Self introduction.
  • Having a mentor in my life and serving as a mentor to others has always been important to me. My first mentor in education was a man many of you may know. His name is Bill Leary. Dr. Leary was my first superintendent. He believed in me and encouraged me always. Knowing his high expectations set the bar for my work. If you know anything about Dr. Leary (and most in the room did know him) you know that Bill bleeds blue and white. He is a proud Penn Stater. Like Bill Leary, Joe Paterno was also a great mentor.
  • At the recent Memorial for Joe Jimmy Cefalo spoke about the impact of Joe Paterno’s mentorship on his life. In Jimmy’s last term of his college career, he was finished playing football and his major requirements were complete. He planned to have some fun in that last semester in the “Happy Valley.” Paterno called Jimmy to his office. Waving Jimmy’s less-than-challenging schedule in his hand Joe told Jimmy that he was better than that schedule. You see, Joe’s challenge was always-“Today you are going to get better or you are going to get worse, but you are never going to stay the same.”  Jimmy had no additional value to provide the PSU football team. But he did have value to Joe Paterno. Joe cared and Jimmy knew it. Jimmy walked out of that office with a different schedule. Now that is mentorship.
  • As educators, we are challenged with the same issue: keeping our students plugged in to learning until graduation day and making them believe they matter–that someone cares what they do and what they become. I believe that Hatboro-Horsham’s Community-Based Learning opportunities challenge our students to make a clear choice: to get better. “Today you are going to get better or you are going to get worse, but you are never going to stay the same.”

Slide 2:

Slide 3:

  • Our first offering: Internship. We encouraged our seniors to use our community as their classroom. Why? For the student: To try on a profession before going to college to prepare for that profession.
  • We have found that some of our students confirm their future plans through the internship experience while others find their chosen internship career possibility is not for them. We consider it a win-win either way.

Slide 4:

  • A friend of mine was recently asked to give a TED talk. When I asked her what they told her concerning how to prepare she shared this directive: Be interested, be generous, be interesting, connect. That’s when I realized that our Community-Based Learning program made the same demand of our students.
  • We began our Internship opportunity for students 7 years ago. We started with 14 students and since that time hundreds of students have participated in the program.

Slide 5:

  • The Internship experience did a great job attracting our college-prep students. The students who elected this course were gaining many important transferable skills and developing career maturity* at a faster rate than our very capable Honors/AP students and our Academic students. The question then became: How do we attract all students to Community-Based learning experiences?
  • In an effort to involve more students in Community-Based learning we expanded our offerings. Our honors and AP students can intern over the summer in a program we call Bridges. Academic students elect a new work-study program, Working Initiatives.  Our Life Skills students are also involved in work-based training opportunities. Additional supporting experiences such as Lunch & Learn and our Futures Fair are well received by our student body.

Slide 6:

  • I would be remiss if I did not tell you how important our community partners are to our program. Hatboro and Horsham are vital communities.

Slide 7:

  • Our champions include the Greater Horsham Chamber of Commerce, the Hatboro-Horsham Educational Foundation, Impact Thrift Stores, Horsham Township to name a few. Local post-secondary programs and the Montgomery County Workforce Investment Board also offer resources and support.

Slide 8:

  • Each Community-Based learning opportunity I’ve mentioned and most you have seen during this presentation offer students two mentors-a community member committed to mentoring a young person and a teacher who has dedicated their professional life to mentoring students with the goals of developing a life-long love of learning and future success.
  • The outcome? Students who elect Community-Based learning experiences do better in all academic classes during the CBL experience. They seek post secondary options, stay in post secondary programs and graduate from post secondary programs at a higher rate than their peers as well as graduate from these programs in a more timely manner.
  • Seth Godin once said that “Caring is a competitive advantage…” Community-Based learning opportunities are the result of caring. At Hatboro-Horsham we care because “Today you are going to get better or you are going to get worse, but you are never going to stay the same.”  Is there really a choice? Caring is our competitive advantage.

Thank you Dr. Leary.

Thank you Mr. Paterno-Hail to the Lion

*Career maturity is demonstrated by teenagers of high school age when they:

  1. Understand the importance of narrowing career interests as a basis for postsecondary planning;
  2. Have, by the 10th grade, identified one or more career interests after an objective evaluation of their likes and dislikes, their aptitudes, and labor market projections;
  3. Have, by the end of the twelfth grade, engaged in activities to verify these choices; and
  4. Used these choices to make post-high school decisions.

Ken Gray-Getting Real: Helping Teens Find their Future